Craig Ford

Anchor, reporter and assistant news director
for WTVA-TV, Tupelo-Columbus, Miss.

1,372 notes

afp-photo:

CHINA, HONG KONG : Protestors and student demonstrators hold up their cellphones in a display of solidarity during a protest outside the headquarters of Legislative Council in Hong Kong on September 29, 2014. Hong Kong has been plunged into the worst political crisis since its 1997 handover as pro-democracy activists take over the streets following China’s refusal to grant citizens full universal suffrage. AFP PHOTO / XAUME OLLEROS

afp-photo:

CHINA, HONG KONG : Protestors and student demonstrators hold up their cellphones in a display of solidarity during a protest outside the headquarters of Legislative Council in Hong Kong on September 29, 2014. Hong Kong has been plunged into the worst political crisis since its 1997 handover as pro-democracy activists take over the streets following China’s refusal to grant citizens full universal suffrage. AFP PHOTO / XAUME OLLEROS

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Why journalists matter? Meet Damon Chappie

Saturday’s death of former Ohio Congressman Jim Traficant led Chris Cillizza of The Washington Post to write a piece about the reporters who covered the lawmaker.  One name that came up — Damon Chappie, a journalist who uncovered the illegal and unethical acts of congressmen such as Traficant.  One reporter Cillizza spoke with was Paul Kane, who worked with Chappie at Roll Call:

"Traficant was a decades-long crook. He extorted money from his own staff — forcing them to slide envelopes of cash under his office door in Youngstown. He took bribes. He shook down donors. All the while, Youngstown slid deeper and deeper into economic despair…."

But us congressional reporters just wrote about how colorful and flamboyant he was.

Except Damon, who, because of a bogus blood transfusion in the 1980s and a crazy virus, was blind. Yet Damon saw what others couldn’t see. For years at Roll Call he stayed ahead of the investigation, tracing the roots of the corruption and staying in sync with the prosecutors.”

Damon Chappie died in 2004, but his work is one shining example of what great reporting can do.

Filed under journalism damon chappie jim traficant