Craig Ford

Anchor, reporter and assistant news director
for WTVA-TV, Tupelo-Columbus, Miss.

215 notes

To know what we’re getting into, we need information that keeps up with the constantly shifting realities across the most dangerous areas of Syria and Iraq. We need people like James Foley, and now that he’s gone his value seems incalculable.
George Packer on James Foley. (via newyorker)

(Source: newyorker.com, via guardian)

166 notes

socimages:

"Tourist, shame on you": Disaster tourism in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. 
By Lisa Wade PhD
When tourists returned to New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, there was a new site to see: disaster.  Suddenly — in addition to going on a Ghost Tour, visiting the Backstreet Cultural Museum, and lunching at Dooky Chase’s — one could see the devastation heaped upon the Lower Ninth Ward.  Buses full of strangers with cameras were rumbling through the neighborhood as it tried to get back on its feet.
A sociology major at  Michigan State University, Kiara C., sent along a photograph of a homemade sign propped up in the Lower Ninth, shaming visitors for what sociologists call “disaster tourism.”
Disaster tourism is criticized for objectifying the suffering of others.  Imagine having lost loved ones and seen your house nearly destroyed. After a year out of town, you’re in your nastiest clothes, mucking sludge out of your house, fearful that the money will run out before you can get the house — the house your grandmother bought and passed down to you through your mother — put back together.
Imagine that — as you push a wheelbarrow out into the sunlight, blink as you adjust to the brightness, and push your hair off your forehead, leaving a smudge of toxic mud — a bus full of cameras flash at you, taking photographs of your trauma, effort, and fear.  And then they take that photo back to their cozy, dry home and show it to their friends, who ooh and aah about how cool it was that they got to see the aftermath of the flood.
The person who made this sign… this is what they may have been feeling.
Photo credit: Daniel Terdiman/CNET News.com; found here.
Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the co-author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

socimages:

"Tourist, shame on you": Disaster tourism in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

By Lisa Wade PhD

When tourists returned to New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, there was a new site to see: disaster.  Suddenly — in addition to going on a Ghost Tour, visiting the Backstreet Cultural Museum, and lunching at Dooky Chase’s — one could see the devastation heaped upon the Lower Ninth Ward.  Buses full of strangers with cameras were rumbling through the neighborhood as it tried to get back on its feet.

A sociology major at  Michigan State University, Kiara C., sent along a photograph of a homemade sign propped up in the Lower Ninth, shaming visitors for what sociologists call “disaster tourism.”

Disaster tourism is criticized for objectifying the suffering of others.  Imagine having lost loved ones and seen your house nearly destroyed. After a year out of town, you’re in your nastiest clothes, mucking sludge out of your house, fearful that the money will run out before you can get the house — the house your grandmother bought and passed down to you through your mother — put back together.

Imagine that — as you push a wheelbarrow out into the sunlight, blink as you adjust to the brightness, and push your hair off your forehead, leaving a smudge of toxic mud — a bus full of cameras flash at you, taking photographs of your trauma, effort, and fear.  And then they take that photo back to their cozy, dry home and show it to their friends, who ooh and aah about how cool it was that they got to see the aftermath of the flood.

The person who made this sign… this is what they may have been feeling.

Photo credit: Daniel Terdiman/CNET News.com; found here.

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the co-author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

149 notes

nprradiopictures:

About a dozen military veterans have locked themselves inside a caged boxing ring, in a rough part of San Diego, and they’re starting to throw punches. It’s therapeutic, they say.

"A lot of people say, ‘You guys are punching each other in the face. How is that helpful?’ " says Aaron Espinoza, a former Marine. "But it’s a respect thing, it’s mutual. I have to push him, he has to push me to get better."

Espinoza is a regular at P.O.W., which stands for Pugilistic Offensive Warrior, a mixed martial arts training session that’s free for veterans. Iraq veteran Todd Vance founded the group after his own struggle with post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD.

"I was in a dark place for a long time and I personally used mixed martial arts to get myself back on track," says Vance. "Once I got back on track I went to school — studying social work."

First Rule Of The Fight Club: You Must Be A Veteran

Photo Credit: David Gilkey/NPR

(via lookatthisstory)

244 notes

afloweroutofstone asked: Are there any tips you would give aspiring journalists that no one gave you?

npr:

Well, I didn’t have any connections to journalism and don’t come from a well-connected family or place by any means. Here’s what I did:

1. Hustle. In college, I wrote a humor column, edited the student humor magazine and wrote freelance articles for lots of publications.

2. Be nice. I take time to meet with interns, coworkers, people from other journalism organizations, etc. Not because I’m trying to network or anything. Just because it’s good to be nice to everyone. This is a general life rule, not a journalism rule.

3. Be curious. This is another good life rule. It’s good to talk with lots of different people, who are both like you and not like you. I am a really big advocate for inclusion in journalism and in our newsroom. It’s good to think about different people and different ideas.

4. Don’t always toot your own horn. This is my mom’s rule. I always give credit where it’s due and frequently advocate for other people and ideas. This is always a good thing as well.